Wuerdemann Family Web Site

Würdemann, Wuerdemann, Wuerdeman, Wurdeman, Wörtman, Woertman and Seagroatt

Würdemann, Johann Heinrich[1]

Male 1838 - 1919  (81 years)


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  • Name Würdemann, Johann Heinrich 
    Nickname John Henry Wurdeman 
    Born 12 Feb 1838  Ahlhorn, Oldenburg, GER. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 1 Aug 1919  Columbus, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery; Leigh, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I14029  Wuerdemann Family
    Last Modified 22 Oct 2009 

    Father Würdemann, Johann Diedrich,   b. 30 Jun 1809, Littel, Oldenburg; GER. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1872, Platte County, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Mother Schnitger, Catherine Margarethe,   b. 20 Jun 1813, Ahlhorn, Oldenburg; GER. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jun 1839, Ahlhorn, Oldenburg; GER. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 25 years) 
    Married 30 Dec 1834  Evangelical Lutheran Kirchengemeinde, Grossenkneten, Oldenburg, GER. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F4626  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Mueller, Elise,   b. UNKNOWN, Wickmansburg, Hanover, GER. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Nov 1954, Norfolk, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 19 Jul 1916  Immanuel Lutheran Church; Columbus, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 18 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F4201  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Wilke, Catharina Margarete,   b. 2 Feb 1839, Sage Gemeinde, Oldenburg, GER. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Oct 1915, Columbus, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 4 Feb 1866  Mayville, WI. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Wurdeman, Rudolph Henry,   b. 26 Nov 1866, Mayville, WI. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jan 1941, Columbus, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     2. Wurdeman, Louisa Louise,   b. 23 Nov 1868, Maryville, WI. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Jun 1935, Columbus, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     3. Wurdeman, Charles Carl,   b. 28 Jan 1871, Platte County, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Jul 1961, Columbus, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
     4. Wurdeman, Franklin,   b. 3 Feb 1873, Platte County, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Nov 1959, Columbus, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     5. Wurdeman, Edward,   b. 6 Apr 1875, Platte County, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Sep 1946, Minneapolis, MN. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
     6. Wurdeman, Alma,   b. 10 Dec 1878, Rural Platte County, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Feb 1958, Columbus, NE. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
    Last Modified 18 Dec 2017 
    Family ID F4839  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • _P_CCINFO 2-14330
      John Henry emigrated to Chicago, IL. and then to Nebraska. Bob Wurdeman indicates that he came to the US in 1860 and to Platte County in 1869.

      From the COLUMBUS TELEGRAM, Friday , August 3,1919:

      J. H. Wurdeman, whose unfortunate death occurred last Friday morning was a veteran of the Civil War, a pioneer in Sherman Township, and at one time the largest land owner in Platte County. Funeral Services were conducted by Rev. R. Neumarker at the residence on eighth street, Tuesday morning at eight o'clock, and by Rev. Dohlen at the St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Sherman Township at 10:00 AM. Burial was made in the little cemetery near the church. Six of the grandsons bore the body to the sepulchre.

      Mr. Wurdeman was a native of Alhorn, Oldenburg; Germany, where he was born February 12,1838. He lived there until he reached the age of 22 years. Rather than be drafted into a military system for which he had no sympathy, he came to the United States to be a citizen of this country. He arrived May 31,1860 and went to Dekalb County, IL. where he secured work on a farm. Though he had left Germany rather than serve in the army, he was quick to go to the defense of his adopted country when the call went out for volunteers for the Civil War. Little more than a year after he came over, he was in the thick of the fight, doing his bit to help preserve the Union.

      He enlisted August 28,1861. with Company D; 39th Regiment; Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served four years, three and one half months. Twice he was wounded and several other times he narrowly escaped death. Near Richmond, VA. on October 13,1864 a bullet penetrated his left cheek and because of inefficient medical service, there it remained for more than three months. Inthe fighting around Fort Gregg on April 2,1865, Mr. Wurdeman was wounded in the right front leg by grapeshot from the guns of the Fort. On the same day, when he stooped to avoid being hit, a cannon ball shattered the rifle he carried over his shoulder.

      Mustered out of the service as a corporal, December 13,1865 at Springfield, IL., he went to Mayville, WI. where he secured a position as a clerk in store. There on February 4,1866, he married Catherina M. Wilke. They came to Nebraska in March,1869, home steading in Sherman Township. With an abiding faith in the development of the new country to which they had come, Mr. Wurdeman bought land, and still more land, until he acquired nearly 2500 acres, most of which he divided among his sons and daughters about three years ago.

      Many years ago Mr. Wurdeman was one of the organizers of the Maple Valley Bank of Leigh. He served as its president and his son, Ed Wurdeman, as its cashier, until about ten years ago when it was consolidated with the Farmers' and Merchants Bank and it became First National. For several years he was vice president of the new institution. He also was one of the founders andoriginal stockholders in the Commercial Bank of Columbus, and was long a member of Baker Post No. 9, G.A.R.

      His first wife passed away October 17,1915. Three years ago he married Mrs. Anna Kumpf of Columbus, retired from the farm, and made his home in the city for the rest of his life. Besides his widow, he leaves four sons- Rudolph, Charles, Frank, and Edward Wurdeman, all of Columbus; two daughters- Mrs John Ahrens and Mrs Fred Feye, residing north of the city, twenty- five grand children, two step-sons Emil Kumpf of Columbus and Otto Kumpf of Albion, and two step- daughters, Mrs F.R. Gregorius of Columbus and Mrs William Hemphill of Chicago.

      From THE LEIGH WORLD (Date Unknown)-

      J.H.Wurdeman, pioneer of Sherman Township, but a resident of Columbus for the last three years was drowned in the Loup River at an early hour last Friday morning. Joe Stanzel and Louis Glur, who were fishing along the north bank south of the south end of Lover's Lane found the body shortly after daybreak. It had evidently floated down the river shortly before and lodged inthe shallow water, for it was not there when they had run their lines at 3 AM.

      There were no marks of violence on the body and Coroner Otto Walter who was called to the scene and was present when the lifeless form was removed from the water by Deputy Sheriff CharlesJaworski, said that probably no inquest would be held. The body was taken to the Gaws undertaking rooms.

      Mr. Wurdeman left his home at 1403 Eighth Street some time before daybreak. He retired as usual, about ten o'clock, the previous night. This morning, when Mrs Wurdeman went to his room tocall him, he was not there. He had packed his clothing in a grip and suitcase, and she thought perhaps that he had gone over to one of his son's homes. The bed had been occupied.

      For several years, Mr. Wurdeman, who was 81 years old, had been in feeble health, subject to fainting spells, but Mrs. Wurdeman says he seemed to be much better of late, though somewhat eccentric.

      Facts about this person:

      Emigration 1858

      Source: AUSWANDERER AUS DEM KIRCHSPIEL GROSSENKNETTEN
      Medium: Book
      Dierk Feye, Compiler; Fichenstr.8, 2930 Varel 1; GE.

      Several abstract documents were located in Mayville (not Maryville), WI where John Henry went after the Civil War. It appears they were quite lax about names as there are three entries for John Henry, and they are all different. A warranty deed was dated 3/17/1866 purchasing city lot 2, block 7 as Henry Wurdeman, and selling it on 4/19/1866 as Henry Wuerderman and wife Catharina. There is another document dated 3/24/1868 buying Lot 3, Block 6 as J H Wuerdemann. If these are in fact both John Henry, then it is curious that he is Wurdeman and Wuerdeman in 1866 but back to Wuerdermann in 1868?
      John Henry emigrated to Chicago, IL. and then to Nebraska. Bob Wurdeman indicates that he came to the United States in 1860 and to Platte County in 1869.

      From ANDREAS HISTORY OF THE STATE OF NEBRASKA. Platte County, Published 1892-

      JOHN HENRY WURDEMAN, farmer, Section 10, P. O. Columbus, was born in Oldenburg, February 12, 1838. He came to America in 1860, landing at New York City in May. he went to De Kalb county, Ill., remaining until Christmas. He then went to Ogle County, Ill., where in August, 1861, he enlisted in Company D. Thirty-ninth Illinois Infantry, serving until December 21, 1865; was in the Army of the James; was wounded at the battle of Petersburg and at the siege of Richmond; was promoted to Corporal, which position he held until his discharge. He then went to Mayville. Wis., where he was employed as a clerk in a general store until 1869. He then married, February 4, 1866, Miss C. M. Wilke, also a native of Oldenburg. They have six children--Rudolph, Louisa, Charles, Franklin, Edward and Alma. In March, 1869, he moved to Nebraska, locating in Platte County. He now has a large farm of 490 acres, 250 acres in cultivation; thirty acres in pasture under fence.
      ___________________________________

      FROM THE PAST AND THE PRESENT, PLATTE COUNTY, NEBRASKA, Volume II-

      John Henry Wurdeman, a retired farmer living on section 9, Sherman township, is one of the veterans of the Civil war who proudly wears the little bronze button that proclaims him a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. Throughout his entire life he has manifested the same spirit of loyalty to his country which he displayed when he followed the nation's starry banner upon the battlefields of the south. At the same time he has been a most enterprising and progressive business man, accomplishing results which show his forcefulness, resourcefulness, industry, and capability. He was born in Ahlhorn, Oldenburg, Germany, February 12, 1838, and has therefore passed the seventy-seventh milestone on life's journey. His father, Diedrich Wurdeman, was a farmer of Germany and came to the United States in 1871, in which year he homesteaded in Sherman township, Platte county, but did not get the deed to the land, for he died in 1872, at the home of his son, John H. He was married three times and John Henry Wurdeman was one of the two children born of the first marriage. His religious faith was that of the Lutheran church.

      Mr. Wurdeman, whose name introduces this review, attended school in Germany in the village in which he lived and at fourteen years of age began work as a farm hand. In 1860 he came to the United States and for six months worked as a farm hand at a wage of ten dollars per month, at South Grove, De Kalb County, Illinois. He then went to Ogle County, Illinois, where he received fourteen dollars per month for his services, but at the time of the Civil war he put aside all business and personal considerations and, responding to the call of his adopted country, enlisted on the 28th of August, 1861, as a member of Company D, Thirty-ninth Illinois Infantry, joining the command at Lindenwood, Illinois. He entered the service as a private and was promoted to the rank of corporal. He veteranized on the 5th of September, 1864, and on the 13th of October of the same year was wounded, after which he carried the bullet in his left cheek until January 21, 1865. His first injury was sustained at Darbytown Crossroads, Virginia, and on the 2d of April, 1865, he was wounded by grape shot in the right leg, at Fort Gregg, Virginia. Company D was organized at Rochelle, Illinois, and was among the first to be assigned for active duty. The regiment was quartered in the old Republican Wigwam on Market street in Chicago, and the company was the first to meet the advance force of the enemy under General Stonewall Jackson, at Bath, Virginia, on the 3d of June, 1862, entering upon the engagement without preliminary skirmish tactics. They were again and again upon the firing line, displaying a spirit of courage and nobility, and at the expiration of their three years' term, three-fourths of the company re enlisted as veterans at Hilton Head, South Carolina. On being first mustered in, the company left Chicago, went to St. Louis and thence proceeded to Hagerstown, Maryland, where they were given Springfield rifles and were engaged in doing guard duty on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. They participated in the battle of Winchester on the 23rd of March, 1862, against Jackson, and from that time on were again and again on active duty on the firing line. Mr. Wurdeman made a most creditable military record as a brave and loyal soldier and has every reason to be proud of the reputation won by his command.

      In 1866 he went to Dodge county, Wisconsin, where he engaged in clerking in a store. While residing there he was married and in March, 1869, he removed to Platte county, which was then a western frontier district. There was no bridge over the Missouri river at Omaha and the fare from Omaha to Columbus was nine dollars and sixty cents. Mr. Wurdeman secured a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres in Sherman township, on which was a primitive house, half sod and half dugout. He was among the first settlers to penetrate into this region and there was little evidence of development and improvement. During his first winter he built a log cabin twelve by eighteen feet, hewing the logs on his own claim, and during the first three years he used an ox team for plowing. As time passed on his labors wrought a marked transformation in the claim, which he converted from raw prairie into richly cultivated and productive fields. Starting in with one hundred and sixty acres, he added to his holdings from time to time as opportunity offered and his financial resources increased. He had eighty acres on section 8, four hundred and eighty acres on section 9, two hundred and eighty acres on section 10, forty acres on section 15 and two hundred and forty acres on section 16, Sherman township, together with three hundred and twenty acres in Stanton county, Nebraska, but has given all of this land to his children. The various tracts were fine farming. land, the soil being naturally rich and productive, and in addition to cultivating his fields, Mr. Wurdeman engaged extensively in stock-raising and did much to improve the grade of stock raised in the county. He was also one of the organizers of the Maple Valley State Bank at Leigh, Nebraska, and when it was sold to the First National he became vice president of the latter. He has always been a most active and progressive man, ready to meet any emergency and carrying forward to successful completion whatever he has undertaken. His well directed efforts have found visible evidence in his various farm properties and his indefatigable industry made him one of the most substantial residents of the county.

      On the 4th of February, 1866, at Mayville, Wisconsin, Mr. Wurdeman was united in marriage to Miss Catharina Margaretha Wilke, a native of Oldenburg, Germany, born February 2, 1839, and a daughter of John Wilke, who was a landowner and agriculturist of that country. Mr. and Mrs. Wurdeman are the parents of six children, as follows: Rudolph H., a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work; Louise, the wife of John Ahrens, who is also represented on another page of this volume; Charles, an architect of Columbus; Frank, a biography of whom appears on another page; Edward, the vice president of the First National Bank of Columbus; and Alma, the wife of Fred Feye, a sketch of whom is given on another page of this work.

      After a happy married life of almost fifty years Mrs. Wurdeman passed away October 17, 1915, loved and respected by all who knew her. She was an earnest Christian and was always ready and willing to aid those in sickness or distress.

      Mr. Wurdeman was a member of the Grand Army post at Creston until it was discontinued and during his residence in Columbus held membership with the post there. He retired to Columbus in 1891, and tried living in town in a modern residence, but preferring rural life, he returned to the farm and now makes his home on section 9, Sherman township. He has assisted in furthering every improvement of the township and he has served as a member of the county board of supervisors. He belongs to the German Lutheran church and his entire life has been guided by high and honorable principles, making him a man worthy of the esteem and regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. His life has indeed been well spent and furnishes an example that the youth of the present generation may well follow, for his record proves that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously.

      _________________________-

      From the COLUMBUS (NE.) TELEGRAM, Friday , August 3,1919:

      J. H. Wurdeman, whose unfortunate death occurred last Friday morning was a veteran of the Civil War, a pioneer in Sherman Township, and at one time the largest land owner in Platte County. Funeral Services were conducted by Rev. R. Neumarker at the residence on eighth street, Tuesday morning at eight o'clock, and by Rev. Dohlen at the St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Sherman Township at 10:00 AM. Burial was made in the little cemetery near the church. Six of the grandsons bore the body to the sepulchre.

      Mr. Wurdeman was a native of Alhorn, Oldenburg; Germany, where he was born February 12,1838. He lived there until he reached the age of 22 years. Rather than be drafted into a military system for which he had no sympathy, he came to the United States to be a citizen of this country. He arrived May 31,1860 and went to Dekalb County, IL. where he secured work on a farm. Though he had left Germany rather than serve in the army, he was quick to go to the defense of his adopted country when the call went out for volunteers for the Civil War. Little more than a year after he came over, he was in the thick of the fight, doing his bit to help preserve the Union.

      He enlisted August 28,1861. with Company D; 39th Regiment; Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served four years, three and one half months. Twice he was wounded and several other times he narrowly escaped death. Near Richmond, VA. on October 13,1864 a bullet penetrated his left cheek and because of inefficient medical service, there it remained for more than three months. In the fighting around Fort Gregg on April 2,1865, Mr. Wurdeman was wounded in the right front leg by grapeshot from the guns of the Fort. On the same day, when he stooped to avoid being hit, a cannon ball shattered the rifle he carried over his shoulder.

      Mustered out of the service as a corporal, December 13,1865 at Springfield, IL., he went to Maryville, WI. where he secured a position as a clerk in store. There on February 4,1866, he married Catherina M. Wilke. They came to Nebraska in March,1869, home steading in Sherman Township. With an abiding faith in the development of the new country to which they had come, Mr. Wurdeman bought land, and still more land, until he acquired nearly 2500 acres, most of which he divided among his sons and daughters about three years ago.

      Many years ago Mr. Wurdeman was one of the organizers of the Maple Valley Bank of Leigh. He served as its president and his son, Ed Wurdeman, as its cashier, until about ten years ago when it was consolidated with the Farmers' and Merchants Bank and it became First National. For several years he was vice president of the new institution. He also was one of the founders and original stockholders in the Commercial Bank of Columbus, and was long a member of Baker Post No. 9, G.A.R.

      His first wife passed away October 17,1915. Three years ago he married Mrs. Anna Kumpf of Columbus, retired from the farm, and made his home in the city for the rest of his life. Besides his widow, he leaves four sons- Rudolph, Charles, Frank, and Edward Wurdeman, all of Columbus; two daughters- Mrs John Ahrens and Mrs Fred Feye, residing north of the city, twenty- five grand children, two step-sons Emil Kumpf of Columbus and Otto Kumpf of Albion, and two step- daughters, Mrs F.R. Gregorius of Columbus and Mrs William Hemphill of Chicago.
      ______________________________

      From THE LEIGH (NE.) WORLD (Date Unknown)-

      J.H.Wurdeman, pioneer of Sherman Township, but a resident of Columbus for the last three years was drowned in the Loup River at an early hour last Friday morning. Joe Stanzel and Louis Glur, who were fishing along the north bank south of the south end of Lover's Lane found the body shortly after daybreak. It had evidently floated down the river shortly before and lodged in the shallow water, for it was not there when they had run their lines at 3 AM.

      There were no marks of violence on the body and Coroner Otto Walter who was called to the scene and was present when the lifeless form was removed from the water by Deputy Sheriff Charles Jaworski, said that probably no inquest would be held. The body was taken to the Gaws undertaking rooms.

      Mr. Wurdeman left his home at 1403 Eighth Street some time before daybreak. He retired as usual, about ten o'clock, the previous night. This morning, when Mrs Wurdeman went to his room to call him, he was not there. He had packed his clothing in a grip and suitcase, and she thought perhaps that he had gone over to one of his son's homes. The bed had been occupied.

      For several years, Mr. Wurdeman, who was 81 years old, had been in feeble health, subject to fainting spells, but Mrs. Wurdeman says he seemed to be much better of late, though somewhat eccentric.

      [ColfaxDeutschlandPlatte.FBK.FTW]

      John Henry emigrated to Chicago, IL. and then to Nebraska. Bob Wurdeman indicates that he came to the United States in 1860 and to Platte County in 1869.

      From ANDREAS HISTORY OF THE STATE OF NEBRASKA. Platte County, Published 1892-

      JOHN HENRY WURDEMAN, farmer, Section 10, P. O. Columbus, was born in Oldenburg, February 12, 1838. He came to America in 1860, landing at New York City in May. he went to De Kalb county, Ill., remaining until Christmas. He then went to Ogle County, Ill., where in August, 1861, he enlisted in Company D. Thirty-ninth Illinois Infantry, serving until December 21, 1865; was in the Army of the James; was wounded at the battle of Petersburg and at the siege of Richmond; was promoted to Corporal, which position he held until his discharge. He then went to Mayville. Wis., where he was employed as a clerk in a general store until 1869. He then married, February 4, 1866, Miss C. M. Wilke, also a native of Oldenburg. They have six children--Rudolph, Louisa, Charles, Franklin, Edward and Alma. In March, 1869, he moved to Nebraska, locating in Platte County. He now has a large farm of 490 acres, 250 acres in cultivation; thirty acres in pasture under fence.
      ___________________________________

      FROM THE PAST AND THE PRESENT, PLATTE COUNTY, NEBRASKA, Volume II-

      John Henry Wurdeman, a retired farmer living on section 9, Sherman township, is one of the veterans of the Civil war who proudly wears the little bronze button that proclaims him a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. Throughout his entire life he has manifested the same spirit of loyalty to his country which he displayed when he followed the nation's starry banner upon the battlefields of the south. At the same time he has been a most enterprising and progressive business man, accomplishing results which show his forcefulness, resourcefulness, industry, and capability. He was born in Ahlhorn, Oldenburg, Germany, February 12, 1838, and has therefore passed the seventy-seventh milestone on life's journey. His father, Diedrich Wurdeman, was a farmer of Germany and came to the United States in 1871, in which year he homesteaded in Sherman township, Platte county, but did not get the deed to the land, for he died in 1872, at the home of his son, John H. He was married three times and John Henry Wurdeman was one of the two children born of the first marriage. His religious faith was that of the Lutheran church.

      Mr. Wurdeman, whose name introduces this review, attended school in Germany in the village in which he lived and at fourteen years of age began work as a farm hand. In 1860 he came to the United States and for six months worked as a farm hand at a wage of ten dollars per month, at South Grove, De Kalb County, Illinois. He then went to Ogle County, Illinois, where he received fourteen dollars per month for his services, but at the time of the Civil war he put aside all business and personal considerations and, responding to the call of his adopted country, enlisted on the 28th of August, 1861, as a member of Company D, Thirty-ninth Illinois Infantry, joining the command at Lindenwood, Illinois. He entered the service as a private and was promoted to the rank of corporal. He veteranized on the 5th of September, 1864, and on the 13th of October of the same year was wounded, after which he carried the bullet in his left cheek until January 21, 1865. His first injury was sustained at Darbytown Crossroads, Virginia, and on the 2d of April, 1865, he was wounded by grape shot in the right leg, at Fort Gregg, Virginia. Company D was organized at Rochelle, Illinois, and was among the first to be assigned for active duty. The regiment was quartered in the old Republican Wigwam on Market street in Chicago, and the company was the first to meet the advance force of the enemy under General Stonewall Jackson, at Bath, Virginia, on the 3d of June, 1862, entering upon the engagement without preliminary skirmish tactics. They were again and again upon the firing line, displaying a spirit of courage and nobility, and at the expiration of their three years' term, three-fourths of the company re enlisted as veterans at Hilton Head, South Carolina. On being first mustered in, the company left Chicago, went to St. Louis and thence proceeded to Hagerstown, Maryland, where they were given Springfield rifles and were engaged in doing guard duty on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. They participated in the battle of Winchester on the 23rd of March, 1862, against Jackson, and from that time on were again and again on active duty on the firing line. Mr. Wurdeman made a most creditable military record as a brave and loyal soldier and has every reason to be proud of the reputation won by his command.

      In 1866 he went to Dodge county, Wisconsin, where he engaged in clerking in a store. While residing there he was married and in March, 1869, he removed to Platte county, which was then a western frontier district. There was no bridge over the Missouri river at Omaha and the fare from Omaha to Columbus was nine dollars and sixty cents. Mr. Wurdeman secured a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres in Sherman township, on which was a primitive house, half sod and half dugout. He was among the first settlers to penetrate into this region and there was little evidence of development and improvement. During his first winter he built a log cabin twelve by eighteen feet, hewing the logs on his own claim, and during the first three years he used an ox team for plowing. As time passed on his labors wrought a marked transformation in the claim, which he converted from raw prairie into richly cultivated and productive fields. Starting in with one hundred and sixty acres, he added to his holdings from time to time as opportunity offered and his financial resources increased. He had eighty acres on section 8, four hundred and eighty acres on section 9, two hundred and eighty acres on section 10, forty acres on section 15 and two hundred and forty acres on section 16, Sherman township, together with three hundred and twenty acres in Stanton county, Nebraska, but has given all of this land to his children. The various tracts were fine farming. land, the soil being naturally rich and productive, and in addition to cultivating his fields, Mr. Wurdeman engaged extensively in stock-raising and did much to improve the grade of stock raised in the county. He was also one of the organizers of the Maple Valley State Bank at Leigh, Nebraska, and when it was sold to the First National he became vice president of the latter. He has always been a most active and progressive man, ready to meet any emergency and carrying forward to successful completion whatever he has undertaken. His well directed efforts have found visible evidence in his various farm properties and his indefatigable industry made him one of the most substantial residents of the county.

      On the 4th of February, 1866, at Mayville, Wisconsin, Mr. Wurdeman was united in marriage to Miss Catharina Margaretha Wilke, a native of Oldenburg, Germany, born February 2, 1839, and a daughter of John Wilke, who was a landowner and agriculturist of that country. Mr. and Mrs. Wurdeman are the parents of six children, as follows: Rudolph H., a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work; Louise, the wife of John Ahrens, who is also represented on another page of this volume; Charles, an architect of Columbus; Frank, a biography of whom appears on another page; Edward, the vice president of the First National Bank of Columbus; and Alma, the wife of Fred Feye, a sketch of whom is given on another page of this work.

      After a happy married life of almost fifty years Mrs. Wurdeman passed away October 17, 1915, loved and respected by all who knew her. She was an earnest Christian and was always ready and willing to aid those in sickness or distress.

      Mr. Wurdeman was a member of the Grand Army post at Creston until it was discontinued and during his residence in Columbus held membership with the post there. He retired to Columbus in 1891, and tried living in town in a modern residence, but preferring rural life, he returned to the farm and now makes his home on section 9, Sherman township. He has assisted in furthering every improvement of the township and he has served as a member of the county board of supervisors. He belongs to the German Lutheran church and his entire life has been guided by high and honorable principles, making him a man worthy of the esteem and regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. His life has indeed been well spent and furnishes an example that the youth of the present generation may well follow, for his record proves that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously.

      _________________________-

      From the COLUMBUS (NE.) TELEGRAM, Friday , August 3,1919:

      J. H. Wurdeman, whose unfortunate death occurred last Friday morning was a veteran of the Civil War, a pioneer in Sherman Township, and at one time the largest land owner in Platte County. Funeral Services were conducted by Rev. R. Neumarker at the residence on eighth street, Tuesday morning at eight o'clock, and by Rev. Dohlen at the St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Sherman Township at 10:00 AM. Burial was made in the little cemetery near the church. Six of the grandsons bore the body to the sepulchre.

      Mr. Wurdeman was a native of Alhorn, Oldenburg; Germany, where he was born February 12,1838. He lived there until he reached the age of 22 years. Rather than be drafted into a military system for which he had no sympathy, he came to the United States to be a citizen of this country. He arrived May 31,1860 and went to Dekalb County, IL. where he secured work on a farm. Though he had left Germany rather than serve in the army, he was quick to go to the defense of his adopted country when the call went out for volunteers for the Civil War. Little more than a year after he came over, he was in the thick of the fight, doing his bit to help preserve the Union.

      He enlisted August 28,1861. with Company D; 39th Regiment; Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served four years, three and one half months. Twice he was wounded and several other times he narrowly escaped death. Near Richmond, VA. on October 13,1864 a bullet penetrated his left cheek and because of inefficient medical service, there it remained for more than three months. In the fighting around Fort Gregg on April 2,1865, Mr. Wurdeman was wounded in the right front leg by grapeshot from the guns of the Fort. On the same day, when he stooped to avoid being hit, a cannon ball shattered the rifle he carried over his shoulder.

      Mustered out of the service as a corporal, December 13,1865 at Springfield, IL., he went to Maryville, WI. where he secured a position as a clerk in store. There on February 4,1866, he married Catherina M. Wilke. They came to Nebraska in March,1869, home steading in Sherman Township. With an abiding faith in the development of the new country to which they had come, Mr. Wurdeman bought land, and still more land, until he acquired nearly 2500 acres, most of which he divided among his sons and daughters about three years ago.

      Many years ago Mr. Wurdeman was one of the organizers of the Maple Valley Bank of Leigh. He served as its president and his son, Ed Wurdeman, as its cashier, until about ten years ago when it was consolidated with the Farmers' and Merchants Bank and it became First National. For several years he was vice president of the new institution. He also was one of the founders and original stockholders in the Commercial Bank of Columbus, and was long a member of Baker Post No. 9, G.A.R.

      His first wife passed away October 17,1915. Three years ago he married Mrs. Anna Kumpf of Columbus, retired from the farm, and made his home in the city for the rest of his life. Besides his widow, he leaves four sons- Rudolph, Charles, Frank, and Edward Wurdeman, all of Columbus; two daughters- Mrs John Ahrens and Mrs Fred Feye, residing north of the city, twenty- five grand children, two step-sons Emil Kumpf of Columbus and Otto Kumpf of Albion, and two step- daughters, Mrs F.R. Gregorius of Columbus and Mrs William Hemphill of Chicago.
      ______________________________

      From THE LEIGH (NE.) WORLD (Date Unknown)-

      J.H.Wurdeman, pioneer of Sherman Township, but a resident of Columbus for the last three years was drowned in the Loup River at an early hour last Friday morning. Joe Stanzel and Louis Glur, who were fishing along the north bank south of the south end of Lover's Lane found the body shortly after daybreak. It had evidently floated down the river shortly before and lodged in the shallow water, for it was not there when they had run their lines at 3 AM.

      There were no marks of violence on the body and Coroner Otto Walter who was called to the scene and was present when the lifeless form was removed from the water by Deputy Sheriff Charles Jaworski, said that probably no inquest would be held. The body was taken to the Gaws undertaking rooms.

      Mr. Wurdeman left his home at 1403 Eighth Street some time before daybreak. He retired as usual, about ten o'clock, the previous night. This morning, when Mrs Wurdeman went to his room to call him, he was not there. He had packed his clothing in a grip and suitcase, and she thought perhaps that he had gone over to one of his son's homes. The bed had been occupied.

      For several years, Mr. Wurdeman, who was 81 years old, had been in feeble health, subject to fainting spells, but Mrs. Wurdeman says he seemed to be much better of late, though somewhat eccentric.

      Original individual @I00090@ (@MS_WURDEMANNGM.GED1@) merged with @I4276@ (@MS_WURDEMANLEGACYG0@)
      @NF0021@
    • Found JH improperly recorded in the Union army records as Wurdiman: I had them add the alternate name:

      John H. Wurdiman (First_Last)
      Regiment Name 39 Illinois Infantry
      Side Union
      Company D
      Soldier's Rank_In Pvt.
      Soldier's Rank_Out Corpl.
      Alternate Name John H./Wurdeman
      Notes
      Film Number M539 roll 101

  • Sources 
    1. Gedcom File C:/Program Files/GenMerge/output/wurdemanlegacyGM.ged oswald.FTW Date of Import: Jul 8, 2001 Wurdeman.FTW Date of Import: Nov 25, 2001 ColfaxDeutschlandPlatte.FBK.FTW Date of Import: 3 May 2008 oswald.FTW Date of Import: Jul 8, 2001 Wurdeman.FTW Date of Import: Nov 25, 2001 ColfaxDeutschlandPlatte.FBK.FTW Date of Import: 3 May 2008 Gedcom File C:/Program Files/GenMerge/output/wurdemanlegacyGM.ged oswald.FTW Date of Import: Jul 8, 2001 Wurdeman.FTW Date of Import: Nov 25, 2001 ColfaxDeutschlandPlatte.FBK.FTW Date of Import: 3 May 2008.